Dean Foods Estate, via Stipulation and Order, to pay 90% of Post-Bankruptcy USDA Milk Marketing Obligations

As the Southern Foods Group / Deans Foods Estate winds up its affairs in their Chapter 11 Bankruptcy proceedings, a lingering question had been “were the obligations to Producer Settlement Funds ever paid, and how would they be resolved?”

An Order entered on January 15th, 2021 at the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division, provides at least a portion of that answer. This payment will not cover pre-petition obligations (obligations incurred before the Nov. 12, 2019 filing date) of approximately $16 Million, which USDA indicates it will continue to pursue.

Below is a news release posted at the USDA AMS website. The complete order can be found at the Southern Foods Chapter 11 Docket, Document 3366.

The USDA – AMS News Release in its entirety:

January 19, 2021

On January 15, 2021, the Honorable Chief Judge David R. Jones, of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas, signed and entered a Stipulation and Agreed Order (Order) between the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), which is serving as legal counsel of record for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Dean Foods.

The Order requires Dean Foods to pay within 30 days $29,082,182.26, which is 90 percent of its obligations to the USDA for milk marketed in April 2020 and May 2020.

On November 12, 2019, Southern Foods Group, LLC, et al., (Dean Foods) filed a voluntary petition for relief under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. At that time, Dean Foods had 43 plants regulated by the federal milk marketing order (FMMO) system. Subsequent to the filing date, Dean Foods, as the Debtor-in-Possession (Dean DIP), failed to make payments to USDA for milk marketed from April 1, 2020, through May 4, 2020, totaling $32,313,535.84. The missed payments included monies owed to the FMMO program, the National Dairy Research and Promotion Program and the National Fluid Milk Processor Promotion Program.

Upon receipt of payment, USDA will remit monies owed to FMMO-regulated handlers and the Dairy and Fluid Milk Promotion Boards. Once handlers receive payments from USDA, FMMO regulations require that the money be promptly remitted to producers.

Procedures for handler payments to producers will be communicated through the respective FMMO Market Administrators.

Dean Foods’ $16 million pre-petition debt owed to USDA is not covered by this Stipulation and Agreed Order. USDA filed timely Proofs of Claim for these pre-petition obligations and will continue to pursue payment of those claims through the bankruptcy proceeding.

Actions from Farm Bureau, PA Milk Marketing Board and others result in Defense to ASK / Dean Foods Demands

Two Weeks of Furious Activity Sets Farmers, Haulers on Paths to Resolution with a Team Effort

The Background: During the week of and prior to Wednesday, November 25, former Dean Foods independent producers and milk haulers began to receive “Demand” letters from ASK, LLP, a law firm specializing in recovery of ‘preferential payments.’ In a concise definition, ‘Preferential Payments’ are often made by entities filing bankruptcy in the 90 days prior to the filing, and in bankruptcy law, it is perfectly legal for attempts to be made to recoup those monies for other purposes in bankruptcy proceedings.

NOTE: This blog post is providing information about legal events, but should not be taken as legal advice. The author is not an attorney. Qualified attorneys are cited and referenced.

When producers began receiving these letters, reactions ranged from dismay, agony, and horror, to disbelief, to scoffs such as “that money came to me as a regular payment – I’m not paying it back!,” to “We have a situation, what should we do?” With deadlines of December 19th and December 24th in those letters, the truth, the legalities, and appropriate responses had to be sorted out in a very short time frame, to make sure producers met legal requirements.

Several dairy industry and agriculture advocacy groups have, since late Wednesday, Nov. 27th, and early morning on Friday, November 27th, worked furiously and tirelessly to challenge the ASK letters, and to keep the monies where they rightfully belonged – in the hands of dairy producers and local farm communities. Through email networks, phone calls, messages via email and text, news stories, podcasts, blog posts, letters from dairy organizations, and conference calls, it has been an ‘all hands on deck’ effort to assist producers and milk haulers in a ‘defense’ to those letters. Here is a summary:

Earlier this week: Newsletters from AgriVoice (excerpts)

ACTIONS by organizations regarding ASK Letters (per Dean Estate) to Producers trying to get ‘payback’ monies from farmers, others;  Resolution seems to be approaching

Over the past 10 days, a number of organizations and individuals in key positions in several states have been diligently working on behalf of producers to help determine paths for producers to challenge the ASK letters received Thanksgiving week, in order to resolve the situation with minimal legal costs and headaches to individuals farmers.  American Farm Bureau, and the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board, courtesy of Counsel Doug Eberly, have taken these actions:


– American Farm Bureau Challenges ASK with Strongly Worded Letter (For news release & letter, please scroll)

– FORMS YOU CAN USE to reach resolution (LINK):  The Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board has been in communications with ASK, and working with that firm, has developed  “Resolution Forms” which can be used by all affected farmers and/or haulers to send to ASK in order to avoid any payback:  

  1. SEE LINKAvoidance Claim Settlement Offers from ASK, LLP
  2. PRINT OFF & READ CAREFULLY
  3. Note: The first two pages explain the situation, then there is a form for farmers to fill out, and a page for haulers to use. Be careful to make sure you select the appropriate form!
  4. FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS
  5. FILL IN with your information
  6. SEND to ASK via an appropriate method to the party named on the forms you receive – get confirmation it has been received and you should be well on the way to resolution
  7. You MUST send these forms in, for documentation purposes.
  8. Don’t forget – please take a moment to send both parties notes or emails of appreciation, and any others who have worked on this – for instance, your state organization and advocacy groups! 
  9. Contacts at Farm Bureau:  Travis Cushman, travisc@fb.org,  Dale Moore, dalem@fb.org,  John Newton, jnewton@fb.org 
  10. At PA Milk Marketing Board: Doug Eberly, deberly@pa.gov.    

Dec. 4, 2020 – News Release posted at American Farm Bureau Federation

The American Farm Bureau Federation is standing-up for hundreds of dairy farmers being targeted by predatory lawyers representing the estate of Dean Foods, which is currently undergoing bankruptcy proceedings. Almost 500 dairy farmers who once sold milk to Dean Foods received letters threatening legal action unless they refund money legitimately earned prior to the bankruptcy filing.

“Shame on these predatory lawyers for bullying dairy farmers at a time when many are struggling to keep their farms running,” said American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall. “It’s ludicrous to suggest the meager profits from regularly scheduled and routine milk sales – sales that are heavily watched and regulated by the federal government – were outside the regular course of business. Someone needs to have the farmers’ backs and I’m proud to say AFBF is stepping-in to do just that.”

AFBF sent a letter to the law firm managing the Dean Foods estate calling for an immediate reversal of their “predatory shakedown” and threatening potential legal action if the firm fails to withdraw the letters sent to farmers. In the letter, AFBF General Counsel Ellen Steen says the letters sent to farmers “are deceptive and constitute an abuse of process that attempts to extract funds that the Debtor (Dean Foods) is not entitled to under the threat of a lawsuit. Put plainly, your letters are a predatory shakedown, written in legalese.”

Many recipients of the Debtor letters are independent farmers already struggling through difficult economic times made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. The letters put producers in an impossible position—either pay the amounts demanded or incur the cost of legal counsel to defend against the Debtor’s allegations.

The AFBF letter outlines the legal legitimacy of the payments made to dairy farmers and admonishes the lawyers representing Dean Foods for knowingly taking advantage of farmers, saying, “Sending the Letters under these circumstances is not only deceptive, but outrageous because they threaten legal action when in fact the Producers have no legal exposure for the reasons set forth herein.”AFBF further calls upon those lawyers to retract their demands by notifying each farmer by separate letter within 10 business days; returning any funds already received; and by ceasing any litigation against farmers who did business with the company. The AFBF letter clearly states a willingness to step-in in the event that the Dean Foods estate pursues litigation against farmers.

-American Farm Bureau Federation

READ THE LETTER ITSELF – HIGHLY RECOMMENDED READING!

News Release, December 9th from PA Milk Marketing Board

PMMB QUICK ACTION LEADS TO RESOLUTION OF PAYMENT DEMANDS

The Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board, working with the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s office and ASK LLP, has developed declarations to respond to avoidance claim settlement offers received by Pennsylvania dairy farmers and milk haulers.  The declarations, available on the Board’s website at https://www.mmb.pa.gov/Consumer/Pages/default.aspx, are a simple and standardized way for farmers and haulers to demonstrate that they received payments from Dean Foods in the ordinary course of their business with Dean.  

Dairy farmers and milk haulers should read the explanation on the Board’s website and return the appropriate declaration to ASK.  We emphasize that it is vitally important that farmers and haulers return the completed declarations to ASK as soon as possible.

In a bankruptcy, payments made by the debtor during the 90 days prior to the bankruptcy filing may be avoided and recovered under some circumstances.  In the continuing aftermath of last year’s Dean Foods bankruptcy, dairy farmers and milk haulers received avoidance claim settlement offers from ASK LLP seeking to recover a portion of the payments they received during that 90-day period.  However, if dairy farmers and milk haulers demonstrate that payments were received in the ordinary course of their business with Dean, those payments may not be recovered, and those farmers and haulers do not have to return those payments.

Because milk marketing is highly regulated, the Board believes that the settlement offers’ request for records spanning May 2018 through November 2019 is not necessary to demonstrate that dairy farmers and milk haulers received payments in the ordinary course of their business with Dean.  ASK agreed to accept declarations in lieu of the records.  After receiving and reviewing a declaration, ASK will seek authority from its client to close the file and then inform the farmer or hauler.

Board Secretary Carol Hardbarger stated that the cooperation received from not only the Attorney General’s office, but other organizations such as the Center for Dairy Excellence and the PA Farm Bureau, enabled the quick resolution of this issue.  Board Chairman Robert Barley and Member Jim Van Blarcom echoed that sentiment.

The information provided is not legal advice and is not a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed attorney.

_______ ADDITIONAL REFERENCES and RESOURCES ___________

11 Dec. 2020, am: Recap & Summary, including FAQs from a PMMB Conference Call on Dec. 10th: ” Milk producers, haulers, MUST respond to ‘Dean’ letters; PMMB Declaration Letters can be used by those affected in ALL states,” written and posted by Sherry Bunting, AgMoos

10 Dec 2020: “Preferential Transfers/Payments: A Conversation with Michael Fielding” – a podcast from Paul Goehringer, University of Maryland, where the entire concept is explained in ‘layman’s terms’ by an attorney

7 Dec 2020:   An Additional Article: ‘Declarations’ Pave Way for Resolution to Dean Settlement Offer Claims,”    by Dave Natzke, for Progressive Dairyman


9 Dec 2020:  Ready for a chuckle? – A humorous description of the situation: “Old Ebenezer Would Have Been Proud of Dean Foods,” by our own Ryan Bright, of Philadelphia, posted at Growing America.
_______________________

A TEAM EFFORT – All will continue to work until resolution: There are many government officials, organizations and individuals both nationally, and in several states, who continue to work on this issue.  Much of this work is being done behind the scenes, and there may be a few days when we don’t hear or know anything while people do the work that matters, using their resources, according to their professional processes. 

In the meantime, make sure you fill out and submit your paperwork to ASK, and take care of what you can do as a farmer or hauler.   All involved are aware of the pending deadlines which were noted in the packets which producers received;  those deadlines vary from December 19th through December 24th. These packets also contain different names of whom to respond – make sure your ‘defense response and declaration’ is directed to the correct party. 

ANY UPDATES WILL BE POSTED AS AVAILABLE.

Dean Foods Chapter 11: Status of Requests for Repayment by ASK, LLP; Liquidation plan filed, Jan. hearing scheduled

Dean Foods Chapter 11: Quickly Evolving Events weeks of Nov. 23rd through December 4th, 2020 – a Year after filing

WHAT SHOULD A PRODUCER DO ABOUT THE REQUESTS FROM ASK SUGGESTING FARMERS SHOULD PAYBACK MONEY?” is the question first and foremost on farmers’ minds.   Most are electing to wait until more information is gathered before sending any money to this law firm, realizing some of the deadlines are pending. This situation has been and continues to be QUICKLY EVOLVING, with information changing by the minute.


NOTICE: This post contains and refers to information and reports about legal events, with some attorneys quoted and official legal notices included, but should not be considered legal advice.  I am not an attorney, so any information should be considered as public information, and not taken as advice on a course of action for any individual.


LEGAL REFERENCE:  Case #19-36313, US Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of Texas-Houston; Presiding Judge:  David R. Jones

SUMMARY – some good news:  

The good news is that producers do have recourse and options per many industry reports, although the exact course of action has yet to be determined, and it may differ for individual producers.  

ADDITIONAL COURT ACTIVITY this week:  On Nov. 30, Southern Foods Group, LLC / Dean Foods et.al. filed several documents outlining a “Plan of Liquidation” in the above-referenced Bankruptcy Action.  (See graphic below).  Some producers have received emails, or may receive letters in the mail, regarding a hearing related to this process, scheduled for Jan 11 at 2:30 pm. (Doc. 3234 at the Epiq Southern Foods Court Docket)  Producers can participate in this January proceeding via audio/video if they wish.  

SUMMARY REPORT:

Past Week:  As many already know, there has been a lot of activity since the last week of November, 2020, concerning an attempt from ASK, LLP to reclaim a portion of funds paid to producers, and other entities doing business with Dean Foods, in the 90 days prior to the Dean Foods/Southern Foods Group Chapter 11 Bankruptcy filing on Nov. 12 of 2019.


Who all got the notices?  It has been confirmed through several sources that farmers were not the only parties who got such notices: a few co-ops and other business entities, such as milk check assignees, consultants, and milk haulers, also received similar letters, and have challenged the requests in a variety of ways.  The resolution of these challenges is not yet known.


Since producers began receiving letters on or about Wednesday, Nov. 25, there has been a flurry of phone calls, text messages, communication to and among agricultural advocacy organizations and dairy producer groups, and others trying to gather and assemble all pertinent information.


The main goal was to establish a producer’s rights and potential courses of action in regards to these solicitation letters from ASK, LLP, and to determine if a producer would eventually be required to pay the requested amounts at all.  Just because ASK asked, does not necessarily mean they will receive.

In communications with many, most farmers have elected to wait until more information was forthcoming before they paid anything to this third party, some have engaged individual attorneys, and some have elected to wait to see if their is a ‘blanket’ recourse on a collective group of farmers.  

The Beginning: How ASK, LLP got involved:

ASK, LLP is working based on contingency fees ranging from 15-27.5%, stated in a ‘letter of engagement’ on the Bankruptcy Court’s Docket. This ‘letter of engagement’ is dated July 18, 2020, and was sent to Gary Rahlfs, Chief Financial Officer, Southern Foods Group/Dean Foods.  That engagement was approved by via a Court Order of Sept. 1, 2020.  That Order, Document #2898, was publicly posted at the Bankruptcy website on Sept. 1, 2020, and it can be downloaded.    

On Social Media?  Be careful!!!  By this time, social media is full of posts of dismay, indignation, and asking what to do.  While these posts generally may be interesting to read, they should not be considered as valid sources of legal information or advice.  

SUMMARY ARTICLES   (the most complete, most accurate, and most in-context with the entire situation – all contain pertinent information):


Dec 3, 2020: Update on Dean Trustee Letters demanding payment from farmers. Don’t pay. Gather records. Fight back, by Sherry Bunting, based on a cover article which has been printed in this week’s edition of Farmshine, and is now in the mail to subscribers.

Dec. 3, 2020:  Milk payment process officially described, relative to Dean trustee avoidance claims seeking partial payback from farmers, by Sherry Bunting, posted at AgMoos blog.  Includes information regarding ‘regular course of business procedures, regulated by Federal Milk Marketing Order rules, under the supervision of USDA.’  This post also appears as an article in the Dec. 4th edition of Farmshine.

  • Both articles are full of various useful pieces of information
  • The “Milk Payment Process” describes usual course of business transactions in the fluid milk industry
  • Various scenarios described in both
  • Bunting notes she is not an attorney

Dec. 3, 2020:  Bankruptcy and the Preferential Payment Rule, posted at the Agricultural Law and Taxation Blog, by Roger McEowen, a professor of Agricultural Law and Taxation for the Washburn University School of Law, Topeka, Kansas

  • Includes insight from Joe Peiffer, described as one of the country’s leading farm bankruptcy attorneys, working with Ag and Legal Business Strategies of Cedar Rapids, Iowa
  • Describes differing situations when avoidance claims will apply, and when they won’t

Dec. 3, 2020: Dairy Farmer Says She Won’t Be Bullied into Repaying $50,000 to Dean Foods, by Tyne Morgan, for AgWeb/ Farm Journal

  • The perspective of Jessica Peters, Spruce Row Farm, at Meadville, PA
  • Details her range of emotions when she got her letter of ‘legal jargon’

Dec. 3, 2020: DFA Calls Dean Foods Estate Claims “Farfetched,” by Anna-Lisa Laca for AgWeb/Farm Journal

  • Quote from article: “We find it extremely disappointing that hardworking dairy farm families are now put in the position of having to incur costs, either in paying the amounts demanded, or obtaining legal counsel to defend themselves against these farfetched claims.”

Dec. 1, 2020:  Dairy Farmers Asked to Return Dean ‘Preference’ Payments, by Dave Natzke, for Progressive Dairyman.  Highlights:

  • An attorney, Justin Mertz, with Michael Best, weighs in, via an interview, on three possible defenses, or reasons a party may not have to meet the demands in the letter
  • DFA did not receive notices as part of their Asset Purchase Agreement with Dean Foods, which was approved by the court – they are ‘disappointed’ by this action.


CONCURRENTLY:  On this past Monday, Nov 30, Southern Foods Group, LLC, Dean Foods, and Debtor Affiliates filed on the Court Docket two significant documents:  

Document 3230: JOINT CHAPTER PLAN OF LIQUIDATION of SOUTHERN FOODS GROUP, LLC, DEAN FOODS COMPANY, and THEIR DEBTOR AFFILIATES  (75 pages) with the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas – Houston Division, and 

Document 3229 (143 pages), which is captioned:  
MOTION OF DEBTORS FOR ENTRY OF AN ORDER (I) APPROVING THEDISCLOSURE STATEMENT, (II) ESTABLISHING PROCEDURES FOR THESOLICITATION AND TABULATION OF VOTES TO ACCEPT OR REJECT THEPLAN, (III)APPROVING THE FORMS OF BALLOTS AND SOLICITATIONMATERIALS, (IV) ESTABLISHING THE VOTING RECORD DATE, (V) FIXINGTHE DATE, TIME, AND PLACE FOR THE CONFIRMATION HEARING ANDTHE DEADLINE FOR FILING OBJECTIONS THERETO, (VI) APPROVINGRELATED NOTICE PROCEDURES, AND (VII) GRANTING RELATED RELIEF

CONFERENCE CALL NEXT THURSDAY – via PA Center for Dairy Excellence


The PA Center for Dairy Excellence is graciously inviting those affected by this Dean Foods event to participate in a Conference Call on Thursday, Dec. 10, 2010.   The Dean situation is only one to be discussed – Rob Barley and Doug Eberly, Counsel for the PA Milk Marketing Board, will address the letters and how they affect farmers. 

QUICKLY MOVING, EVOLVING SITUATION – Stay Tuned


It is expected there are other significant actions and news to be shared in the next few days, since this is a quickly moving event with pending response deadlines as early as Dec. 19th.  Rest assured that many individuals, information networks, and advocacy organizations are trying to get answers and information to folks as quickly as they can. 

Geri Berdak named new CEO of The Dairy Alliance

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Via an email announcement from Glen Easter, the President of The Dairy Alliance, the southeast dairy organization has named Geri Berdak, as their new CEO.
She has previously worked with the St Louis Dairy Council, and was with the Dairy Innovation Center at DMI from 2012-15.
Following is the complete announcement:
“We are pleased to announce that after a nationwide search by Fred Pabst with the search firm Herd Freed Hartz, The Dairy Alliance board has selected a new CEO, Geri Berdak, who will be starting September 1, 2020.
 
“Geri is an executive known for delivering strategic growth for non-profit organizations, CPG and ingredient companies in the wellness marketplace. She holds unique combination of nutrition, marketing and business aptitude and a genuine passion improving people’s lives. Her professional experience in the dairy industry started with her position as a nutritionist and educator for the St. Louis Dairy Council.  
 
She has extensive knowledge in the food and beverage industry holding positions with PepsiCo, Kerry’s, Isagenix, and served as Senior VP, Nutrition Strategy and Business Development with the U.S. Dairy Innovation Center at DMI from 2012-2015. Most recently she created the Cloverquest Group LLC, a marketing consulting group in Chandler, AZ.

Geri has an Master’s of Business Administration from New York Institute of Technology and a Bachelor of Science in Food & Nutrition from Missouri State University.

Our interim CEO, Molly Szymanski, will work closely with Geri to ensure a smooth transition.”

The Dairy Alliance is a dairy promotion organization based in Atlanta, Georgia.  The organization is funded by checkoff monies which are deducted from the milk checks of dairy farmers.
Ms. Berdak can be found on Twitter with the handle of @nutriagirl.
5_Dairy_Alliance_CEO

Changes in Dollar General Dairy Coolers in the Southeast; DG Fresh Distribution Centers Shift Available Brands

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Changes are happening in Dollar General dairy cases. In the southeast, this means that there will be visible changes in brands on the cooler shelves.  In some cases, depending on location, this means that familiar ‘local’ brands, which supported farms in the immediate local area, will no longer be available to consumers in at their community Dollar General.

In late 2018, Dollar General announced plans for a new “DG Fresh” Distribution plan, and opened their first regional distribution center for perishable goods in Pottsville, Pennsylvania. During 2019, 4 more regional warehouses were built, with several of those coming on-line in late 2019 and early 2020.

Part of this plan included the expansion of the Dollar General’s in-house Clover Valley brand onto milk cartons sold in the regular DG stores, whereby Dollar General would further utilize its own private label. For a few years, Clover Valley branded milk has been available in the Dollar General Markets (the grocery format DG, but without a huge footprint like the stores you see every 5-6 miles).

Affecting the lower Southeast milkshed most directly are two of those warehouses, one in Atlanta, GA, and another in Montgomery, AL.  In some regions, this means that familiar local brands will no longer appear on the shelves of their local Dollar General stores.

Perhaps the most affected region will be East Tennessee.  Beginning in the second week of June, 2020, local dairy farmers and their families, following their habits, went into Dollar Generals specifically to purchase Mayfield brands (Mayfield in the yellow carton and Fieldcrest in a translucent carton), but were startled to see they were no longer available.  Instead, they saw Clover Valley private labels and PET branded milks.

For several years, local consumers in East TN could rest assured they would be supporting their local dairy farm neighbors by purchasing either Mayfield or Fieldcrest brands at a Dollar General store.  Many dairy farm families and their friends and neighbors shopped at Dollar General because they knew the chain supported their farms.  This grass-roots promotion by the farmers themselves, who knew retail brands were a means of connecting their farms with a consumer sale, sent many customers to Dollar General.  Those farmers will now be sending those consumers to other retailers.

This Dollar General move ultimately means local milk from East Tennessee dairy farms, processed at the Mayfield Dairy plant in Athens, has lost a significant amount of retail shelf space in the immediate area.   Sources, who asked not to be identified, said the milk will still have a Dollar General home, but will be processed and packaged in Athens, then hauled to a warehouse in the Montgomery, AL area, for distribution in the coastal southeast.

Dollar General has now built 5 of a projected 17 regional distribution centers for refrigerated and fresh products.  Those distribution warehouses will serve as hubs in which Dollar General will supply their own stores, instead of relying on Direct Store Delivery (DSD) from various vendors and other regional food distributors.

Atlanta DG Fresh Warehouse will serve East TN:   Up until now, Dollar Generals in East Tn, North Georgia, and SW Virginia had received their milk deliveries directly from Mayfield trucks, arriving 2-3x a week.   Beginning this June 2020, they will receive milk from a DG Fresh warehouse located in the Atlanta area.  That warehouse will receive packaged milk from the Pet Dairy Plant at Spartanburg, SC, which does buy milk from southeast farms, just generally not Tennessee farms.

Change was underway before the Dean Foods bankruptcy:  Both Pet and Mayfield were previously owned by Dean Foods, but as of May 1st, are now owned by Dairy Farmers of America, Inc, the nation’s largest milk cooperative.  The Dollar General plan was initiated in the latter half of 2018, and was well underway before the Dean Foods / Southern Foods Group, LLC Chapter 11 bankruptcy was  filed in November of 2019, and long before the DFA purchase of Mayfield, Pet and other Dean Foods operations.

So, what’s in store for Dollar General dairy cases?  Here’s a sampling of what’s being seen thus far (as of June 19, 2020).  The changeover isn’t quite complete, and it hasn’t been determined how wide a geographic area this will affect. At this time, it’s unknown how Dollar Generals in the middle TN area, which has been served by Purity and its private Dairy Belle label, will be affected.

Point of Pride now gone for East Tn Farmers:  Many dairy farmers in East TN were very happy that Dollar General carried the Mayfield and Fieldcrest brands, and many shopped at Dollar General for that very reason. After all, it was a Tennessee-based company carrying a highly nutritious product that was produced on Tennessee farms. And that milk not only affected dairy farms, it was a means of connection for other farms who grew grains and hay that went to feed those Mayfield cows. That intense in-state connection has now been broken by a Dollar General corporate decision for ‘efficiency’ for Dollar General.  Farmers may understand it, but it doesn’t make it any less painful for them to not be able to make that connection with a product on a shelf.

The ‘short-description’ of the new ‘milk domino game’ type of distribution:

  • Milk, largely from farms in the Carolinas and NW Georgia, will be processed at the PET plant in Spartanburg, SC, then shipped to a DG Warehouse in Atlanta, for distribution to DG stores in GA, East TN, and as far west as Birmingham AL. (there might be slight variations in the distribution territory).
  • Milk from East TN and North Georgia farms will be processed at Athens, TN, packaged in cartons wearing the Mayfield and Clover Valley brands, then shipped to Montgomery, AL for distribution in the Coastal South.
  • It’s not yet known how this switch will affect FL, VA, and KY and areas farther west.
  • Observation: As Covid-19 panic buying ensued in March and April, Dollar General stores in the southeast experienced milk shortages like grocery stores.  However, some of the shortages in DG were also likely due to DG personnel getting adjusted to this new distribution schematic.  Even this week, there have been some very empty Dollar General coolers, particularly a couple of days after a delivery.

But above all, Dairy Farmers in the South do appreciate everyone who buys any of these southeast brands, and we appreciate Dollar General for buying milk from southeast farms!

Photos tell the story:

The Changes in Chugs in East TN (the ‘drop in and get it to go cause it’s local’ size):

17_Dollar_General_Changes_Chugs_June_20

GALLONS:  Some Comparisons of the new and previous in East TN:

17_Dollar_General_Gallons_Fieldcrest_Clover_Valley

PLANT CODES:  How we know where the milk was processed (most farms in the southeast know where the farms are) along with a note about the “Best By” date:

17_Dollar_General_Codes_Dates_TN

 

History of DG Fresh Implementation, and Background:

Dollar General has over 16,000 stores, and approximately 5,000 are now receiving goods from their DG Fresh Perishable Goods warehouses.  The company hopes to be nationwide with this effort within 3-4 years.  Here’s a progression:

Mar 15, 2019: Dollar General Shifting to Self-Distribution of Fresh and Frozen; by Russell Redman for Supermarket News

  • The effort began in very early 2019 with 300 stores in the Northeast, distribution facility located in Pottsville, PA
  • CEO Todd Vasos said “DG Fresh will allow us to control our own destiny in fresh foods.”
  • Vasos: “In addition, self-distribution will allow us to offer a wider selection of our own private brands to provide our customers with even more compelling value. Overall, we expect DG Fresh to allow us to do a better job of tailoring our product selection to fit the needs of our customers, particularly in rural areas.”

March 19, 2019:  Dollar General Brings Perishables Distribution In-House, Will Open 975 New Stores in in 2019, by Glenn Taylor, for Retail Touch Points

Aug 29, 2019: Dollar General Encouraged by DG Fresh Rollout,by Ron Ruggles for Supermarket News

Aug 29, 2019: Dollar General Expanding DG Fresh to Fourth Distribution Center, posted at Produce Blue Book

  • From one warehouse in PA in Jan of 2019, then one in NC and GA during the spring and summer of 2019,  adding another in Indiana last fall

Dec 6, 2019: Dollar General to open 5th Warehouse in Fresh Distribution Overhaul  by Emma Cosgrove, Supply Chain Dive

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Borden Dairy Sale: New Dairy Opco, LLC (Engles/Capitol Peak & KKR) wins bid, received Court approval June 26

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UPDATE – June 26 2020: US Bankruptcy Court, District of Delaware, Approves Sale to Capitol Peak and KKR

Engles, (Capitol Peak, Previous Dean CEO) partners with KKR & Co. for Successful Bid

Borden Dairy, and its beloved icon, Elsie, have new owners.
Early on the afternoon of June 15, 2020, New Dairy Opco, LLC, was announced as the winning bidder for Borden Dairy Company and its assets, 5 months after Chapter 11 was filed on January 5, 2020.  A notice was posted on the website filing the Borden Chapter 11 Documents for the US Bankruptcy Court of Delaware, and is included below.
A Sale Hearing has been scheduled for Thursday, June 18, 2020 by the Bankruptcy Court. A series of hearings and court activity, dictated by Rules of Federal Court, will take place in the following weeks before a sale is final.
New Dairy Opco, LLC, is an entity comprised of  KKR and Co., a US-based global investment firm, and Capitol Peak Partners, founded by Gregg Engles, a previous Dean Foods CEO.  A Declaration entered on the Court’s docket on June 20, Docket #879, lists that Colin Murphy is the secretary of New Dairy Opco, which is commonly referred to as New Dairy.
GH Acquisition, LLC, and Prairie Farms Dairy, LLC, were announced as the next highest bidders.
This is a breaking news story, and more details will emerge going forward.
This change in ownership will set a new stage for dairy co-ops and independent dairy farms selling milk to the Borden plants, and hopefully provide more certainty to farmers of markets going forward.
 

The Sale Notice as it appeared on the Court’s Docket:

15_Borden_Elsie_New_Dairy_Opco_Court_1
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New Dairy Opco, LLC, became official as a Delaware corporation on June 1, 2020.
According to a Bloomberg report by Jeremy Hill and Isis Almeida, which doesn’t name sources, New Dairy Opco, LLC, is a joint effort of Capitol Peak Partners, headed by Gregg Engles (a previous CEO of Dean Foods), and KKR, said to be the world’s 2nd largest private equity firm.  KKR had been prominently mentioned in the Borden bidding per the filings on the court docket.
In the late stages of the Dean Foods Chapter 11 process, KKR and Borden, along with some other financial entities, offered an alternative plan to the sale of Dean Foods to Dairy Farmers of America (DFA).

The Bloomberg story in its entirety, as first published at 2:20 pm on June 15th (the story has since been updated – see link above):

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Background & Additional Resources:

General: Borden Fact Sheet – Summary: Borden has 12 plants, 91 branches, has 3,300 employees. The plants operate mostly in the southeast, somewhat in a crescent from Charleston, SC to Florida to Texas.  The Fact Sheet also lists plants in Cleveland, OH, and London, KY.

17 June 2020, 2:30 pm: KKR, Former Dean Foods CEO win bid to buy Borden Dairy Co. in Bankruptcy Court;  by Colleen Kotke for the Wisconsin State Farmer,
15 June 2020, 6:01 pm:  Capitol Peak Partners, KKR Win Bankruptcy Auction for Bordenposted at Morningstar, provided by Dow Jones
15 June 2020, 6:29 pm:  KKR, Former Dean Foods CEO win Auction for Borden Dairy Five Months After Bankruptcy Filing, by Natalie Walters for the Dallas Morning News
26 May 2020, 7:00 am: For a Second Time in Borden’s 163-year History, A Government Contract Could Propel it Through Crisis, by Natalie Walters, for the Dallas Morning News

Look for new developments as the story evolves.

 

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CFAP (Coronavirus Food Assistance Program) Details Announced

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(Washington, DC) USDA and White House make CFAP (Coronavirus Food Assistance Program) Announcements at a news conference this morning
Highlights:
  • Trump suggests that officials look into terminating trade deals involving cattle imports
  • FSA Offices begin accepting applications on May 26
  • Final Rule – Read in its entirety at this link (40 pages) (you may also download the document or or print the pdf if you prefer hard copies)
    • Pages 1-24: Administrative Rules with Payment Limits, application to Gross Income, other limitations and interactions
    • Pages 25-40: Payment amounts by Commodity
    • General website for CFAP:  farmers.gov/cfap
    • Cost-Benefit Analysis found here:  25 page pdf
Today, May 19th, 2020, shortly after 11:30 am, the White House held a news conference to announce the highly anticipated CFAP program details have been published.
FSA offices across the country will be accepting applications beginning Tuesday, May 26.  In the meantime, it is highly suggested to thoroughly review the linked documents above and get your pencils ready.
Below is the official USDA News Release:
USDA Announces Details of Direct Assistance to Farmers through the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program
Farmers and Ranchers to Receive Direct Support for Losses Related to COVID-19
(Washington, D.C., May 19, 2020) – U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced details of the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP), which will provide up to $16 billion in direct payments to deliver relief to America’s farmers and ranchers impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. In addition to this direct support to farmers and ranchers, USDA’s Farmers to Families Food Box program is partnering with regional and local distributors, whose workforces have been significantly impacted by the closure of many restaurants, hotels, and other food service entities, to purchase $3 billion in fresh produce, dairy, and meat and deliver boxes to Americans in need.
“America’s farming community is facing an unprecedented situation as our nation tackles the coronavirus. President Trump has authorized USDA to ensure our patriotic farmers, ranchers, and producers are supported and we are moving quickly to open applications to get payments out the door and into the pockets of farmers,” said Secretary Perdue. “These payments will help keep farmers afloat while market demand returns as our nation reopens and recovers. America’s farmers are resilient and will get through this challenge just like they always do with faith, hard work, and determination.”
Beginning May 26, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), through the Farm Service Agency (FSA), will be accepting applications from agricultural producers who have suffered losses.
Background:
CFAP provides vital financial assistance to producers of agricultural commodities who have suffered a five-percent-or-greater price decline due to COVID-19 and face additional significant marketing costs as a result of lower demand, surplus production, and disruptions to shipping patterns and the orderly marketing of commodities.
Farmers and ranchers will receive direct support, drawn from two possible funding sources. The first source of funding is $9.5 billion in appropriated funding provided in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Stability (CARES) Act to compensate farmers for losses due to price declines that occurred between mid-January 2020, and mid-April 2020 and provides support for specialty crops for product that had been shipped from the farm between the same time period but subsequently spoiled due to loss of marketing channels. The second funding source uses the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act to compensate producers for $6.5 billion in losses due to on-going market disruptions.
Non-Specialty Crops and Wool
Non-specialty crops eligible for CFAP payments include malting barley, canola, corn, upland cotton, millet, oats, soybeans, sorghum, sunflowers, durum wheat, and hard red spring wheat. Wool is also eligible. Producers will be paid based on inventory subject to price risk held as of January 15, 2020. A payment will be made based 50 percent of a producer’s 2019 total production or the 2019 inventory as of January 15, 2020, whichever is smaller, multiplied by the commodity’s applicable payment rates.
Livestock
Livestock eligible for CFAP include cattle, lambs, yearlings and hogs. The total payment will be calculated using the sum of the producer’s number of livestock sold between January 15 and April 15, 2020, multiplied by the payment rates per head, and the highest inventory number of livestock between April 16 and May 14, 2020, multiplied by the payment rate per head.
Dairy
For dairy, the total payment will be calculated based on a producer’s certification of milk production for the first quarter of calendar year 2020 multiplied by a national price decline during the same quarter. The second part of the payment is based a national adjustment to each producer’s production in the first quarter.
Specialty Crops
For eligible specialty crops, the total payment will be based on the volume of production sold between January 15 and April 15, 2020; the volume of production shipped, but unpaid; and the number of acres for which harvested production did not leave the farm or mature product destroyed or not harvested during that same time period, and which have not and will not be sold. Specialty crops include, but are not limited to, almonds, beans, broccoli, sweet corn, lemons, iceberg lettuce, spinach, squash, strawberries and tomatoes. A full list of eligible crops can be found on farmers.gov/cfap. Additional crops may be deemed eligible at a later date.
Eligibility
There is a payment limitation of $250,000 per person or entity for all commodities combined. Applicants who are corporations, limited liability companies or limited partnerships may qualify for additional payment limits where members actively provide personal labor or personal management for the farming operation. Producers will also have to certify they meet the Adjusted Gross Income limitation of $900,000 unless at least 75 percent or more of their income is derived from farming, ranching or forestry-related activities. Producers must also be in compliance with Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation provisions.
Applying for Assistance
Producers can apply for assistance beginning on May 26, 2020. Additional information and application forms can be found at farmers.gov/cfap. Producers of all eligible commodities will apply through their local FSA office. Documentation to support the producer’s application and certification may be requested. FSA has streamlined the signup process to not require an acreage report at the time of application and a USDA farm number may not be immediately needed. Applications will be accepted through August 28, 2020.
Payment Structure
To ensure the availability of funding throughout the application period, producers will receive 80 percent of their maximum total payment upon approval of the application. The remaining portion of the payment, not to exceed the payment limit, will be paid at a later date as funds remain available.
USDA Service Centers are open for business by phone appointment only, and field work will continue with appropriate social distancing. While program delivery staff will continue to come into the office, they will be working with producers by phone and using online tools whenever possible. All Service Center visitors wishing to conduct business with the FSA, Natural Resources Conservation Service, or any other Service Center agency are required to call their Service Center to schedule a phone appointment. More information can be found at farmers.gov/coronavirus.

Dean Foods (Estate) Makes Payment of April Settlement Checks to Previous Dean Independent Producers

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UPDATE – JUNE 9th, 2020:  Southeast area farmers, previous Dean Independent producers, report that they have received funds for their April Settlement milk checks via electronic deposit into their bank accounts.   This action follows several letters from producer organizations both to the Court and to the Committee for Unsecured Creditors.

Please scroll for letters from Zippy Duvall, President of the American Farm Bureau Federation, and H. Barlow, Executive Secretary of the Kentucky Dairy Development Council (KDDC), which were sent to the Court. 

The Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board was also active in the process to recover those payments to producers. Read more about their efforts here.

On behalf of the (former) Dean independent producers, we say “THANKS” to the Honorable Judge David Jones, the Court, Dean Foods estate officials, and to all who advocated on their behalf.

At this time, it is not known if dairy co-ops or the FMMO Producer Settlement Funds have received the balance of the funds owed to them by the Dean Foods Estate.

 

Letter from Zippy Duvall, President, American Farm Bureau, to the Court and Dean Foods (Estate) Officials

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Letter from H. Barlow, Executive Secretary, KDDC, to the Court:

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The story as first reported:

 

Payments to Farmers Late at Best, in Question for the Future

A May 13, 2020 memorandum from USDA-Agricultural Marketing Service, Appalachian Order, reads as follows:

TO:  Regulated Handlers

FROM: Harold H. Friedly, Jr., Market Administrator, F.O. 5

SUBJECT: Producer Settlement Fund Non Payment

On May 12, 2020, Dean Foods, DIP (debtor-in-possession), a regulated handler on the Appalachian Order, did not pay its obligation to the Producer Settlement Fund (PSF) as required by Federal Milk Marketing Order regulations. USDA recognizes the significance of this non-payment and is continuing to work with the Department of Justice to attempt to recover these monies as part of the Dean Foods, DIP, estate.

When payment is not made to the PSF, Federal Milk Marketing Order regulations prescribe procedure for how the remaining marketwide pool monies should be distributed to handlers (1005.72).  When PSF monies are not sufficient to make full payments to handlers, the Market Administrator shall reduce uniformly such payments to handlers due a payment from the PSF.

Accordingly, for milk pooled on Order 5 during April 2020, payments to handlers from the PSF have been reduced pro rata.  Should the PSF payments be recovered from Dean Foods, DIP, Estate at a later time, full payments will be distributed.  In the meantime, Federal Milk Marketing Order regulations provide for reduced payments to producers from regulated handlers who did not receive full payment from the PSF (1005.73(c)). Consequently, the enforced minimum payments to producers will be at the pro rata amount.

USDA will continue to monitor the situation and work to assist the dairy industry. Additional information will be provided as it becomes available to all market participants. Please feel free to contact Jason Nierman, via nierman@malouisville.com, or (502) 499-0040, ext. 222, if you have any questions.

The memorandum also had this addendum included:

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This schematic explains workings of a Producer Settlement Fund:

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News could not have come at a worse time:

From an industry viewpoint, this non-payment could not come at a worse time for the farmers themselves.

When monies are received by the Producer Settlement Fund, they in turn are paid back out to handlers (co-ops or agents), who then distribute the money to farmers, paying them for milk sold (see the diagram above).  This process is highly regulated by FMMO rules, and has proven to be predictable, and reliable for decades.

Farmers then use their money to pay bills to any number of agribusiness and service firms with whom they do business.   Since this process has been so reliable, most farmers have set-up automatic withdrawals to pay supply companies.  Farmers will now be dealing with any issues related to those automatic withdrawals and any repercussions due to lack of funds. Agribusinesses will lose money as well, and incur any number of extra costs.

Ravaged by a myriad of challenges due to Covid-19, farmers are facing financial stress of an untold magnitude, and many multi-generational farms with long histories of serving consumers are at risk of being lost. The mental health and fortitude of those farmers is a prime concern across the country, due to the stresses which were already in place. Many fear that this news could catalyze additional health issues in farm communities.

An industry insider, who asked not to be identified, said this Dean Foods payment to the PSF could normally be in a range from $160-$250 million, affecting dairy co-ops, individual farms and the communities they serve in many states.  (Note – this figure will be verified and updated if needed – Covid 19 has changed almost everything.)

 

PERPLEXING:  WHY did this happen given Chapter 11 processes?

This payment, which is a regular course of business in both a predictable amount and timing in getting farms and co-ops paid for milk,  had regularly been made by Dean Foods during the course of the Chapter 11 proceedings.

Therefore, it stands to reason that attorneys, accountants, and consultants representing Dean Foods should have budgeted and accounted for these payments as Dean Foods books were closed out over the course of the next few months. In the last months of the process, fluid milk sales were up substantially according to many sources, which should also have added to Dean Foods income.   (An email inquiry to an attorney representing Dean Foods in the proceedings has not received a response as of this posting.)

This gets even more perplexing since farmers were named as critical vendors in the early days of the Chapter 11 process.  Dean Foods officials filed motions, which were granted by the Court, to ensure that those payments were indeed accomplished. It was believed those financial obligations to farmers for products delivered would have been honored until the last payment was due.

Impact on an individual farm:  During this payment cycle, any single farm would be due payments from thousands of dollars to even hundreds of thousands of dollars, depending on the size of the herd.

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS OR HOPE AHEAD?

At this time, this is a profound question with unknown answers.  Some of those answers might be:

  • Payment to Settlement Funds in all FMM Orders might come at one of the later dates in this payment cycle, being only a few days late
  • Payment to the Producer Settlement Fund might come later, as accounts receivable from product and property sales come into the Dean Estate
  • Payment to farmers might not come at all, which is a bitter pill to swallow at this juncture in history.

Whatever the answer is, farmer co-ops and individual farmers deserve that answer, and deserve it quickly.  Perhaps a projected payment schedule could be stated by the Dean Foods Estate officials.  Even if it’s a worst case answer, to know what that answer is will honor the dignity of earnest farmers who deserve an answer so they can make some possibly excruciating decisions,  instead of ‘the system’ tap dancing around farm families like performers on a Broadway stage.

According to the Dean Foods / Southern Foods Group, LLC Chapter 11 website, two additional Omnibus Hearings are scheduled for May 20 and June 24. 

One dairyman has often said “The dairy industry at the grass roots level is a dairy community full of really good, decent people who want to earn an honest living and contribute to their communities. However, those good people often have to endure some very wicked events.”

Dean Foods has historically paid its ‘independent producers’ well, which is much appreciated.  It is sincerely hoped that Dean Foods closes its chapter on a better note than this non-payment, and quickly rectifies this payment shortfall to farmers.  For the sake of the mental and physical health of many farmers and their families, lets hope they do just that.

 

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Dean Foods Files Bids; DFA successful for most of assets, Court must approve bids

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Attorneys representing Dean Foods in their Chapter 11 proceedings have filed two highly anticipated notices of bids and bid results with the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division.
The notices are Document 1270, Notice of Bid Results, and Document 1271, Notice of Bids.
The Court has a hearing scheduled for April 3, 2010, for the purpose of hearing any objections and furthering the sale process.     Any objections to a Sale Order or a Sale Transaction must be filed by April 1, 2020 at 12:00 pm, CST.
Dairy Farmers of America, Inc. has been announced by Dean Foods as the successful bidder for the great majority of Dean Assets.   This includes 8 facilities situated in the following southeast locations:
  • Athens, TN  (Mayfield)
  • Birmingham, AL (Ice Cream)
  • Nashville, TN  (2 plants – Purity and Country Delite)
  • High Point, NC
  • Winston-Salem, NC
  • Spartanburg, SC  (Pet)
  • Orlando and Orange City, FL  (TG Lee)
Prairie Farms Dairy, Inc. has filed bids which were successful for the Birmingham Fluid Plant (Barber’s), the Hammond Louisiana plant, and the Customer list related to Louisville, KY facility.  Prairie Farms also successfully bid on several plants throughout the Midwest.
The McArthur Dairy assets have a successful bid from Mana Saves McArthur, LLC.
Alternative bids were stated in Document 1270. MD-VA Milk Producers was the Alternate for High Point, NC. OP Church Street Property, LLC, is listed as an alternate for the Country Delite property in Nashville.
Details of various Bid offers for plants across the country can be found in a number of documents at the Epiq Southern Foods website.
The “Notice of Bid Results” – 6 pages long – is posted below:
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Borden Files Chapter 11; Moves to Protect Farmer Payments for Pre-Petition Milk; Interim Motion Approved on Jan. 8th

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UPDATE: Jan. 9th:  The Court issued an Order, posted late on Jan. 8th, which did indeed authorize Borden to pay independent farmers and co-ops, but there is some leeway as to the amount those producers and handlers might be paid.  Independent producers especially are encouraged to read the full 7 pgs. of the Order found here (you may also download and print), and perhaps consult with an attorney for interpretation and clarification.  Some situations may differ per state laws and milk bonding statutes.

Dave Natzke, Progressive Dairyman, has also published a report of the hearing with added information from the courtroom, which may be read here.

 

Borden Dairy Company, et al.,  now becomes the 2nd major dairy company within two months to file for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy to reorganize their financial structure.  Dean Foods, the nation’s largest processor of fluid milk, filed for Chapter 11 protection in November.

The Borden Chapter 11 filing caught many grass-roots dairy farmers off guard, especially due to renewed optimism due to recent new product introductions under the leadership of Tony Sarsam.

Progressive Dairy published an informative report written by Dave Natzke, Editor.

Borden Dairy  issued the following press release about the filing, which can also be accessed on the web:

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When a milk-purchasing company announces bankruptcy, the first question that grass-roots farmers and rural communities is concerned with is “Will those farmers get paid for ‘pre-petition’ milk?”  (That is the milk delivered in the period prior to the filing for which the farmer has not received payment.)   Payment for milk delivered from the day of filing forward is generally protected by the Court.

Normally, independent farmers, those who sell milk directly to a plant or company, and who are not members of a milk cooperative, are left holding the bag, and don’t get paid, because they are generally considered ‘unsecured creditors.’  Some states, but not all, have ‘milk bonding’ statutes, which protect payments to farmers to some degree; some states may protect payment for all or a significant portion of the milk delivered, while others may have bonding statutes which cover only a tiny portion.

In this Borden Dairy Chapter 11 process, the company has filed a Motion with the Court to ask that the Company be allowed to complete those payments to those independent farmers and five milk cooperatives. This Motion was scheduled to be heard as part of the “First Day Hearings” on January 7th, but at the writing of this blogpost, (midnigh/early am, Jan 8th) an Order has not been entered which will actually permit that to happen.  An Order must be entered on the Court’s Docket which will finalize payment.

The documents below, on page 3, paragraphs 7 and 8, note that Borden purchases raw milk from ‘approximately 262 independent family dairy farms’ and ‘five farmers’ cooperatives; collectively, those farmers and cooperatives are called ‘Milk Vendors.’  They also detail the normal times of payment.

The Borden Chapter 11 proceeding is legally known as Case 20-10010-CSS, and is being heard in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware.    Below are the 7 pages of Document 11 in the above captioned case, titled “Declaration of Jason Monaco in Support of Debtors’ Motion for Authorization to Pay Critical Vendors,” which is the Motion asking for payment to farmers.

Affected parties residing in or operating farms in the states of Mississippi or Texas likely need to pay special attention to a Footnote (3)  at the bottom of Page 3. Such parties may need to have this Document 1, along with other documents in this case reviewed by an attorney for interpretation, and have such a qualified attorney determine how this footnote may affect their farming operations.

NOTE:  The author of this blog is not an attorney, and any information posted SHOULD NOT be considered legal advice, only observations. These public documents are posted for information purposes only; it will be up to individual farms affected in this matter to consult attorneys to review their legal rights.

 

Here are the pages of Document 11, the Motion requesting payment to farmers:

 

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Any updates of significant events and/or official rulings by the Court will be added or noted when they are available, as will additional information related to this process.

NOTE:  The AUTHOR of this blog IS NOT AN ATTORNEY, and any information posted SHOULD NOT be considered legal advice. These public documents are posted for information purposes only; it will be up to individual farms affected in this matter to consult attorneys to review their legal rights per their individual situations.  The author has experienced a milk company bankruptcy as a producer, so therefore is familiar with the process from a farmer/producer perspective

 

ON A PERSONAL NOTE:  As Borden now joins Dean Foods in Chapter 11 proceedings, this is the second Financial Reorganization/Bankruptcy filing of a major purchaser of fluid milk in the United States within two months.  Many, many family farms will be affected to some degree by these proceedings, no matter if a farm is an ‘independent’ or a member of a cooperative. In turn, the rural communities across the country in which those farms are located will be affected as well.  May I ask that anyone who is a Believer in a Higher Power please join me in keeping the entire US Dairy Farm industry in your collective prayers?  Thank you for doing that!

May God Bless our Dairy Farms, and our Farming Communities!!

 

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