CFAP (Coronavirus Food Assistance Program) Details Announced

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(Washington, DC) USDA and White House make CFAP (Coronavirus Food Assistance Program) Announcements at a news conference this morning
Highlights:
  • Trump suggests that officials look into terminating trade deals involving cattle imports
  • FSA Offices begin accepting applications on May 26
  • Final Rule – Read in its entirety at this link (40 pages) (you may also download the document or or print the pdf if you prefer hard copies)
    • Pages 1-24: Administrative Rules with Payment Limits, application to Gross Income, other limitations and interactions
    • Pages 25-40: Payment amounts by Commodity
    • General website for CFAP:  farmers.gov/cfap
    • Cost-Benefit Analysis found here:  25 page pdf
Today, May 19th, 2020, shortly after 11:30 am, the White House held a news conference to announce the highly anticipated CFAP program details have been published.
FSA offices across the country will be accepting applications beginning Tuesday, May 26.  In the meantime, it is highly suggested to thoroughly review the linked documents above and get your pencils ready.
Below is the official USDA News Release:
USDA Announces Details of Direct Assistance to Farmers through the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program
Farmers and Ranchers to Receive Direct Support for Losses Related to COVID-19
(Washington, D.C., May 19, 2020) – U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced details of the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP), which will provide up to $16 billion in direct payments to deliver relief to America’s farmers and ranchers impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. In addition to this direct support to farmers and ranchers, USDA’s Farmers to Families Food Box program is partnering with regional and local distributors, whose workforces have been significantly impacted by the closure of many restaurants, hotels, and other food service entities, to purchase $3 billion in fresh produce, dairy, and meat and deliver boxes to Americans in need.
“America’s farming community is facing an unprecedented situation as our nation tackles the coronavirus. President Trump has authorized USDA to ensure our patriotic farmers, ranchers, and producers are supported and we are moving quickly to open applications to get payments out the door and into the pockets of farmers,” said Secretary Perdue. “These payments will help keep farmers afloat while market demand returns as our nation reopens and recovers. America’s farmers are resilient and will get through this challenge just like they always do with faith, hard work, and determination.”
Beginning May 26, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), through the Farm Service Agency (FSA), will be accepting applications from agricultural producers who have suffered losses.
Background:
CFAP provides vital financial assistance to producers of agricultural commodities who have suffered a five-percent-or-greater price decline due to COVID-19 and face additional significant marketing costs as a result of lower demand, surplus production, and disruptions to shipping patterns and the orderly marketing of commodities.
Farmers and ranchers will receive direct support, drawn from two possible funding sources. The first source of funding is $9.5 billion in appropriated funding provided in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Stability (CARES) Act to compensate farmers for losses due to price declines that occurred between mid-January 2020, and mid-April 2020 and provides support for specialty crops for product that had been shipped from the farm between the same time period but subsequently spoiled due to loss of marketing channels. The second funding source uses the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act to compensate producers for $6.5 billion in losses due to on-going market disruptions.
Non-Specialty Crops and Wool
Non-specialty crops eligible for CFAP payments include malting barley, canola, corn, upland cotton, millet, oats, soybeans, sorghum, sunflowers, durum wheat, and hard red spring wheat. Wool is also eligible. Producers will be paid based on inventory subject to price risk held as of January 15, 2020. A payment will be made based 50 percent of a producer’s 2019 total production or the 2019 inventory as of January 15, 2020, whichever is smaller, multiplied by the commodity’s applicable payment rates.
Livestock
Livestock eligible for CFAP include cattle, lambs, yearlings and hogs. The total payment will be calculated using the sum of the producer’s number of livestock sold between January 15 and April 15, 2020, multiplied by the payment rates per head, and the highest inventory number of livestock between April 16 and May 14, 2020, multiplied by the payment rate per head.
Dairy
For dairy, the total payment will be calculated based on a producer’s certification of milk production for the first quarter of calendar year 2020 multiplied by a national price decline during the same quarter. The second part of the payment is based a national adjustment to each producer’s production in the first quarter.
Specialty Crops
For eligible specialty crops, the total payment will be based on the volume of production sold between January 15 and April 15, 2020; the volume of production shipped, but unpaid; and the number of acres for which harvested production did not leave the farm or mature product destroyed or not harvested during that same time period, and which have not and will not be sold. Specialty crops include, but are not limited to, almonds, beans, broccoli, sweet corn, lemons, iceberg lettuce, spinach, squash, strawberries and tomatoes. A full list of eligible crops can be found on farmers.gov/cfap. Additional crops may be deemed eligible at a later date.
Eligibility
There is a payment limitation of $250,000 per person or entity for all commodities combined. Applicants who are corporations, limited liability companies or limited partnerships may qualify for additional payment limits where members actively provide personal labor or personal management for the farming operation. Producers will also have to certify they meet the Adjusted Gross Income limitation of $900,000 unless at least 75 percent or more of their income is derived from farming, ranching or forestry-related activities. Producers must also be in compliance with Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation provisions.
Applying for Assistance
Producers can apply for assistance beginning on May 26, 2020. Additional information and application forms can be found at farmers.gov/cfap. Producers of all eligible commodities will apply through their local FSA office. Documentation to support the producer’s application and certification may be requested. FSA has streamlined the signup process to not require an acreage report at the time of application and a USDA farm number may not be immediately needed. Applications will be accepted through August 28, 2020.
Payment Structure
To ensure the availability of funding throughout the application period, producers will receive 80 percent of their maximum total payment upon approval of the application. The remaining portion of the payment, not to exceed the payment limit, will be paid at a later date as funds remain available.
USDA Service Centers are open for business by phone appointment only, and field work will continue with appropriate social distancing. While program delivery staff will continue to come into the office, they will be working with producers by phone and using online tools whenever possible. All Service Center visitors wishing to conduct business with the FSA, Natural Resources Conservation Service, or any other Service Center agency are required to call their Service Center to schedule a phone appointment. More information can be found at farmers.gov/coronavirus.

Dean Foods (Estate) Fails to Pay FMMO Producer Settlement Funds in Florida, Southeast, and Appalachian Orders

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Payments to Farmers Late at Best, in Question for the Future

A May 13, 2020 memorandum from USDA-Agricultural Marketing Service, Appalachian Order, reads as follows:

TO:  Regulated Handlers

FROM: Harold H. Friedly, Jr., Market Administrator, F.O. 5

SUBJECT: Producer Settlement Fund Non Payment

On May 12, 2020, Dean Foods, DIP (debtor-in-possession), a regulated handler on the Appalachian Order, did not pay its obligation to the Producer Settlement Fund (PSF) as required by Federal Milk Marketing Order regulations. USDA recognizes the significance of this non-payment and is continuing to work with the Department of Justice to attempt to recover these monies as part of the Dean Foods, DIP, estate.

When payment is not made to the PSF, Federal Milk Marketing Order regulations prescribe procedure for how the remaining marketwide pool monies should be distributed to handlers (1005.72).  When PSF monies are not sufficient to make full payments to handlers, the Market Administrator shall reduce uniformly such payments to handlers due a payment from the PSF.

Accordingly, for milk pooled on Order 5 during April 2020, payments to handlers from the PSF have been reduced pro rata.  Should the PSF payments be recovered from Dean Foods, DIP, Estate at a later time, full payments will be distributed.  In the meantime, Federal Milk Marketing Order regulations provide for reduced payments to producers from regulated handlers who did not receive full payment from the PSF (1005.73(c)). Consequently, the enforced minimum payments to producers will be at the pro rata amount.

USDA will continue to monitor the situation and work to assist the dairy industry. Additional information will be provided as it becomes available to all market participants. Please feel free to contact Jason Nierman, via nierman@malouisville.com, or (502) 499-0040, ext. 222, if you have any questions.

The memorandum also had this addendum included:

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This schematic explains workings of a Producer Settlement Fund:

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News could not have come at a worse time:

From an industry viewpoint, this non-payment could not come at a worse time for the farmers themselves.

When monies are received by the Producer Settlement Fund, they in turn are paid back out to handlers (co-ops or agents), who then distribute the money to farmers, paying them for milk sold (see the diagram above).  This process is highly regulated by FMMO rules, and has proven to be predictable, and reliable for decades.

Farmers then use their money to pay bills to any number of agribusiness and service firms with whom they do business.   Since this process has been so reliable, most farmers have set-up automatic withdrawals to pay supply companies.  Farmers will now be dealing with any issues related to those automatic withdrawals and any repercussions due to lack of funds. Agribusinesses will lose money as well, and incur any number of extra costs.

Ravaged by a myriad of challenges due to Covid-19, farmers are facing financial stress of an untold magnitude, and many multi-generational farms with long histories of serving consumers are at risk of being lost. The mental health and fortitude of those farmers is a prime concern across the country, due to the stresses which were already in place. Many fear that this news could catalyze additional health issues in farm communities.

An industry insider, who asked not to be identified, said this Dean Foods payment to the PSF could normally be in a range from $160-$250 million, affecting dairy co-ops, individual farms and the communities they serve in many states.  (Note – this figure will be verified and updated if needed – Covid 19 has changed almost everything.)

 

PERPLEXING:  WHY did this happen given Chapter 11 processes?

This payment, which is a regular course of business in both a predictable amount and timing in getting farms and co-ops paid for milk,  had regularly been made by Dean Foods during the course of the Chapter 11 proceedings.

Therefore, it stands to reason that attorneys, accountants, and consultants representing Dean Foods should have budgeted and accounted for these payments as Dean Foods books were closed out over the course of the next few months. In the last months of the process, fluid milk sales were up substantially according to many sources, which should also have added to Dean Foods income.   (An email inquiry to an attorney representing Dean Foods in the proceedings has not received a response as of this posting.)

This gets even more perplexing since farmers were named as critical vendors in the early days of the Chapter 11 process.  Dean Foods officials filed motions, which were granted by the Court, to ensure that those payments were indeed accomplished. It was believed those financial obligations to farmers for products delivered would have been honored until the last payment was due.

Impact on an individual farm:  During this payment cycle, any single farm would be due payments from thousands of dollars to even hundreds of thousands of dollars, depending on the size of the herd.

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS OR HOPE AHEAD?

At this time, this is a profound question with unknown answers.  Some of those answers might be:

  • Payment to Settlement Funds in all FMM Orders might come at one of the later dates in this payment cycle, being only a few days late
  • Payment to the Producer Settlement Fund might come later, as accounts receivable from product and property sales come into the Dean Estate
  • Payment to farmers might not come at all, which is a bitter pill to swallow at this juncture in history.

Whatever the answer is, farmer co-ops and individual farmers deserve that answer, and deserve it quickly.  Perhaps a projected payment schedule could be stated by the Dean Foods Estate officials.  Even if it’s a worst case answer, to know what that answer is will honor the dignity of earnest farmers who deserve an answer so they can make some possibly excruciating decisions,  instead of ‘the system’ tap dancing around farm families like performers on a Broadway stage.

According to the Dean Foods / Southern Foods Group, LLC Chapter 11 website, two additional Omnibus Hearings are scheduled for May 20 and June 24. 

One dairyman has often said “The dairy industry at the grass roots level is a dairy community full of really good, decent people who want to earn an honest living and contribute to their communities. However, those good people often have to endure some very wicked events.”

Dean Foods has historically paid its ‘independent producers’ well, which is much appreciated.  It is sincerely hoped that Dean Foods closes its chapter on a better note than this non-payment, and quickly rectifies this payment shortfall to farmers.  For the sake of the mental and physical health of many farmers and their families, lets hope they do just that.

 

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Dean Foods Files Bids; DFA successful for most of assets, Court must approve bids

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Attorneys representing Dean Foods in their Chapter 11 proceedings have filed two highly anticipated notices of bids and bid results with the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division.
The notices are Document 1270, Notice of Bid Results, and Document 1271, Notice of Bids.
The Court has a hearing scheduled for April 3, 2010, for the purpose of hearing any objections and furthering the sale process.     Any objections to a Sale Order or a Sale Transaction must be filed by April 1, 2020 at 12:00 pm, CST.
Dairy Farmers of America, Inc. has been announced by Dean Foods as the successful bidder for the great majority of Dean Assets.   This includes 8 facilities situated in the following southeast locations:
  • Athens, TN  (Mayfield)
  • Birmingham, AL (Ice Cream)
  • Nashville, TN  (2 plants – Purity and Country Delite)
  • High Point, NC
  • Winston-Salem, NC
  • Spartanburg, SC  (Pet)
  • Orlando and Orange City, FL  (TG Lee)
Prairie Farms Dairy, Inc. has filed bids which were successful for the Birmingham Fluid Plant (Barber’s), the Hammond Louisiana plant, and the Customer list related to Louisville, KY facility.  Prairie Farms also successfully bid on several plants throughout the Midwest.
The McArthur Dairy assets have a successful bid from Mana Saves McArthur, LLC.
Alternative bids were stated in Document 1270. MD-VA Milk Producers was the Alternate for High Point, NC. OP Church Street Property, LLC, is listed as an alternate for the Country Delite property in Nashville.
Details of various Bid offers for plants across the country can be found in a number of documents at the Epiq Southern Foods website.
The “Notice of Bid Results” – 6 pages long – is posted below:
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Borden Files Chapter 11; Moves to Protect Farmer Payments for Pre-Petition Milk; Interim Motion Approved on Jan. 8th

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UPDATE: Jan. 9th:  The Court issued an Order, posted late on Jan. 8th, which did indeed authorize Borden to pay independent farmers and co-ops, but there is some leeway as to the amount those producers and handlers might be paid.  Independent producers especially are encouraged to read the full 7 pgs. of the Order found here (you may also download and print), and perhaps consult with an attorney for interpretation and clarification.  Some situations may differ per state laws and milk bonding statutes.

Dave Natzke, Progressive Dairyman, has also published a report of the hearing with added information from the courtroom, which may be read here.

 

Borden Dairy Company, et al.,  now becomes the 2nd major dairy company within two months to file for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy to reorganize their financial structure.  Dean Foods, the nation’s largest processor of fluid milk, filed for Chapter 11 protection in November.

The Borden Chapter 11 filing caught many grass-roots dairy farmers off guard, especially due to renewed optimism due to recent new product introductions under the leadership of Tony Sarsam.

Progressive Dairy published an informative report written by Dave Natzke, Editor.

Borden Dairy  issued the following press release about the filing, which can also be accessed on the web:

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When a milk-purchasing company announces bankruptcy, the first question that grass-roots farmers and rural communities is concerned with is “Will those farmers get paid for ‘pre-petition’ milk?”  (That is the milk delivered in the period prior to the filing for which the farmer has not received payment.)   Payment for milk delivered from the day of filing forward is generally protected by the Court.

Normally, independent farmers, those who sell milk directly to a plant or company, and who are not members of a milk cooperative, are left holding the bag, and don’t get paid, because they are generally considered ‘unsecured creditors.’  Some states, but not all, have ‘milk bonding’ statutes, which protect payments to farmers to some degree; some states may protect payment for all or a significant portion of the milk delivered, while others may have bonding statutes which cover only a tiny portion.

In this Borden Dairy Chapter 11 process, the company has filed a Motion with the Court to ask that the Company be allowed to complete those payments to those independent farmers and five milk cooperatives. This Motion was scheduled to be heard as part of the “First Day Hearings” on January 7th, but at the writing of this blogpost, (midnigh/early am, Jan 8th) an Order has not been entered which will actually permit that to happen.  An Order must be entered on the Court’s Docket which will finalize payment.

The documents below, on page 3, paragraphs 7 and 8, note that Borden purchases raw milk from ‘approximately 262 independent family dairy farms’ and ‘five farmers’ cooperatives; collectively, those farmers and cooperatives are called ‘Milk Vendors.’  They also detail the normal times of payment.

The Borden Chapter 11 proceeding is legally known as Case 20-10010-CSS, and is being heard in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware.    Below are the 7 pages of Document 11 in the above captioned case, titled “Declaration of Jason Monaco in Support of Debtors’ Motion for Authorization to Pay Critical Vendors,” which is the Motion asking for payment to farmers.

Affected parties residing in or operating farms in the states of Mississippi or Texas likely need to pay special attention to a Footnote (3)  at the bottom of Page 3. Such parties may need to have this Document 1, along with other documents in this case reviewed by an attorney for interpretation, and have such a qualified attorney determine how this footnote may affect their farming operations.

NOTE:  The author of this blog is not an attorney, and any information posted SHOULD NOT be considered legal advice, only observations. These public documents are posted for information purposes only; it will be up to individual farms affected in this matter to consult attorneys to review their legal rights.

 

Here are the pages of Document 11, the Motion requesting payment to farmers:

 

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Any updates of significant events and/or official rulings by the Court will be added or noted when they are available, as will additional information related to this process.

NOTE:  The AUTHOR of this blog IS NOT AN ATTORNEY, and any information posted SHOULD NOT be considered legal advice. These public documents are posted for information purposes only; it will be up to individual farms affected in this matter to consult attorneys to review their legal rights per their individual situations.  The author has experienced a milk company bankruptcy as a producer, so therefore is familiar with the process from a farmer/producer perspective

 

ON A PERSONAL NOTE:  As Borden now joins Dean Foods in Chapter 11 proceedings, this is the second Financial Reorganization/Bankruptcy filing of a major purchaser of fluid milk in the United States within two months.  Many, many family farms will be affected to some degree by these proceedings, no matter if a farm is an ‘independent’ or a member of a cooperative. In turn, the rural communities across the country in which those farms are located will be affected as well.  May I ask that anyone who is a Believer in a Higher Power please join me in keeping the entire US Dairy Farm industry in your collective prayers?  Thank you for doing that!

May God Bless our Dairy Farms, and our Farming Communities!!

 

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Dean Chapter 11 – HUGE Step 1: Company Steps Up and Will Honor Previous Obligations to Farms

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A HUGE first step will take place in the Dean Foods Chapter 11 Bankruptcy proceedings.
Dairy Farmers will get their payments for milk delivered in the month prior to the date of the Bankruptcy Filing, an almost unprecedented event.  This news was confirmed by a Dean Foods source familiar with the situation on the evening of Thursday, November 14th.
Dean Foods announced on Tuesday, Nov. 12th, 2019, that it had initiated Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in the United States District and Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of Texas, Houston.
From the moment that filing became known, farmers, who are generally seen as unsecured creditors in a milk company bankruptcy, were extremely concerned that they would never receive payment for a month’s worth of milk. In hard dollars, this would be equal to tens of thousands of dollars to multiple hundreds of thousands of dollars, depending on the size of a producer’s herd.
In this case, officials in the Milk Procurement Division of Dean Foods advocated on behalf of payment for their producers.  In a court document titled  “Docket 29, Declaration of Robert Bruce Matson In Support of Debtors Motion to Pay Critical Vendors,”  Matson, Dean’s Senior Director of Milk Procurement, lays out a brilliant and passionate case on why these farmers deserved payment.
Nationwide, this would have been a loss of several millions of dollars scheduled to flow into dairy farm communities across the country. Those monies in turn would pay farm employees, pay feed bills, machinery repair bills, and a host of other expenses related to farm business operations.
These payments are known to apply to independent producers who contract directly with Dean Foods – it is not yet verified if this also applies to co-op handlers.  That will be clarified as quickly as possible.  Also needing more certain clarification will be payment for Nov. 1-11 milk deliveries to milk plants.  With the Nov. 12 filing date, all deliveries from that day forward will be secured as the company works through the Chapter 11 process.
The ability to make those payments, along with flexibility on how to make those distributions, was enabled by Court Orders entered on Wednesday evening, Nov. 13th, in US Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of Texas.
From that point on, it was up to Dean Foods officials to make determinations on what portions of the Settlement payment would indeed make their way to farms.
In an unprecedented bankruptcy in the dairy and food industry, an even rarer occurrence has taken place with this full payment being delivered to what the court defines as an unsecured creditor. Classification as ‘critical vendors’ helped achieve that end.
Officials at Dean Foods deserve an extraordinary amount of credit for taking farmers into consideration in their court documents and pleadings and getting this money to them which will be crucial for ongoing operations as the company determines a future.  If you have the opportunity to say “Thanks” to any of them, please do so.
While we are a very long way from a more stable future in this Chapter 11 Reorganization of the country’s largest milk processor, this is a HUGE first hurdle to cross.
Before this very complex bankruptcy is over, there will be many ups and downs, good days and bad days, and unexpected twists and turns. But on this Day 3 of Bankruptcy proceedings, many farm families are breathing a lot easier.
We hope for a brighter future for both farmers supplying the plants, and the employees processing and distributing the milk.
This will be a ‘one step at a time process.’  More information will be shared as it becomes available
Timeline thus far in a rather fast-paced and frenzied week:
  • Tuesday, Nov. 12th: Bankruptcy documents filed
  • Wednesday, Nov. 13th:  Court pleadings and Orders entered for ongoing operations
  • Wednesday, Nov. 13th: By close of day, over 125 document filed on court’s docket in less than 48 hours.
  • Thursday, Nov. 14th: Word received farmers would receive payment for their previous month’s milk.
  • Monday, Nov. 18th: Payments expected to be delivered to farmers
We are most thankful to a God who has answered many prayers with this news. The prayers for wisdom and guidance continue as we work to a more stable future.
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Dean Foods Files Chapter 11 Bankruptcy: News. Producer Questions. FAQ Sheets

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UPDATE – posted 6:35 pm Tues, Nov. 12:  “Emergency Relief Has Been Requested. A Hearing will be Conducted on this Matter on November 13, 2019 at 2:30 pm [CST] in Houston Tex.”   This information per court documents, TXSB.

Dean Foods, the nation’s largest processor of fluid milk, has filed Chapter 11 Bankruptcy in the Southern District of Texas. According to a company news release, Dean Foods states the company is working toward an ‘orderly and efficient sale of the Company.”

In the same release, Dean Foods also states it is “engaged in advanced discussions with Dairy Farmers of America, Inc. (“DFA) regarding a potential sale of substantially all assets of the Company. If the parties ultimately reach agreement on the terms of a sale, such transaction would be subject to regulatory approval and would be subject to higher or otherwise better offers in the bankruptcy.”

Related to the announcement, Dean Foods cancelled its regular Quarterly Earnings Call, which was scheduled to occur at 9:00 am on the morning of Nov. 12.

Information about the actions and proceedings can be accessed at http://www.deanfoodsrestructuring.com.

The major concern for dairy farm communities – especially the farmers, and  related agribusinesses and community small businesses across the country who serve those farmers – will be how independent dairy farms, who ship directly to Dean Foods plants, will be affected, treated, and compensated during the Bankruptcy proceedings.  Those detailed answers are not available at the time of this initial posting (11:50 am, EST, Nov. 12).

At this time, there are more unanswered questions than answers, and no doubt there will be many anxious farmers and co-ops around the country who depend on milk checks from Dean Foods.  It will take time for accurate answers and solutions to be found as this process works through the reorganizational Bankruptcy process.

For now, here are some FAQ sheets, as posted at http://www.deanfoodsrestructuring.com:

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Here is the related News Release as posted at http://www.deanfoodsrestructuring.com:

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As the news broke on the morning of November 12, here are some additional links from financial news outlets:

From ‘Seeking Alpha’: Initial (breaking) News Release – Dean Foods Files Chapter 11; posted at 7:09 am  – with a link to the news release below:

From ‘Seeking Alpha’: Dean Foods Company Initiates Voluntary Reorganization with New Financial Support from Existing Lenders, a posting with these bullets:

  • Company secures commitments for $850 Million in DIP Financing to Support Operations
  • In Advanced Discussions with Dairy Farmers of America Regarding a Potential Sale
  • Business Continues Regular Operations; Customer Receiving Uninterrupted Supply of Dairy Products as Normal

From ‘Seeking Alpha’: Dean Foods EPS misses by $0.72 – posted at $9.38 am

More information will be posted as it becomes available.

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Beringause, Dean Foods: “It is time we stood up for the Dairy Industry, for our nation’s Dairy Farmers . . .”

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In a bold move, the largest processor and direct store distributor of fluid milk in the United States has decided to leave its membership in the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA), due to differences of opinion with the organization on the labeling of plant-based beverages.

Announcing their decision, Dean Foods issued the following statement: 

“Dean Foods has been a strong supporter of the International dairy Foods Association (IDFA) for many years, however, we have reached a point where one of our key priorities is no longer shared by the entire IDFA organization.  More specifically, as one of the largest dairy processors in the country, we are proud of the role we play in providing one of the most nutritious products in the grocery store – milk – to consumers around the nation.  With this in mind, we believe it is wrong that many plant-based products are currently marketed using milk’s good name, yet are lacking several of the inherent nutrients of their dairy counterparts. Unfortunately, IDFA has been unable to reach consensus and take a stance on this important issue.”

“As a result, we have decided that we can no longer financially support an organization that is not behind one of our core priorities We’ll instead divert our advocacy resources to pursuing accurate product labeling for the benefit of the dairy industry, including farmers, processors, and consumers around the country. We have appreciated IDFA’s support over the years and wish the organization and its member companies the best.”

 

Eric Beringause,  Dean Foods President and CEO, stated the following:

“There are plant-based products called “milk” on grocery store shelves today that don’t include a single drop of dairy.  Even worse, consumers are being misled into believing that these imitation products are as healthy as their dairy counterparts. It is time we stood up for the dairy industry, for our nation’s dairy farmers, for the integrity of our milk products, and for the families who rely on them for adequate nutrition.

We’re exploring every potential avenue for ensuring imitation products are labeled properly, and we welcome others to join us in this effort.”

 

Beringause, who assumed the reins as CEO of Dean Foods on July 29, came with the reputation of having a record of transformation.  In an industry crying for a renewal of sales for ‘nature’s most nearly perfect beverage,’ this decision may be a step in restoring real milk’s identity and reducing consumer confusion.

This move should be well-received by thousands of dairy farmers and industry stakeholders who have been demanding proper labeling of dairy products for years, and who have been seeking a ‘big-player’ advocate with an even bigger voice.

Dean Foods, on behalf of the nation’s dairy farm families, we look forward to working with you to advance the cause of proper labeling in keeping with standards of identity.

 

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